Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Asia Pacific Congress & Expo on Dental and Oral Health Brisbane, Australia .

Day 1 :

Conference Series Dental Congress 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Marc Tennant photo
Biography:

Marc is the Director (and founder) of the International Research Collaborative - Oral Health and Equity (formally the Centre for Rural and Remote Oral Health) at The University of Western Australia. This unique, decade old, Collaborative has given Western Australia leadership in understanding the issues associated with marginalised people and in particular rural, remote and Indigenous oral health in Australia. It has been recognised by WHO for its efforts and has a global reach stretching to all continents of the planet. Following completion of his Doctorate, in Anatomy, the early 1990’s Marc’s research focused for 5 years on cell biology for the last 20 Marc’s research is focused on dental public health and social equity. He has more than 200 peer–review publications to his name and over $US17million in research and development funding. Marc\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'s efforts have made a significant impact on oral health in Australia and in particular groups who are disadvantaged. In 2009 Marc was recognized by the health consumers’ council of Western Australia for services to the community and in 2010 with a meritorious service award from the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons (RACDS) for services to dental education and Aboriginal people. Marc also was an inaugural dental fellow of the Australasian College of Health Service Executives in 2010. In 2013 The University of Western Australia named a newly opened café at the dental school in honour of his services to dental education and the community. And in 2014 he became just the second Western Australian to be made a Fellow of the RACDS by acclaim again focused on his innovative education and service to the global society. In 2015 the University of Malaysia gave him academic icon status for his work on addressing marginalization. Marc, after relinquishing his role as Director of Operations and Deputy Head of School at the Dental School in Western Australia; went on to serve as Inaugural Head of School and Clinical Dean at Griffith University’s new dental school (the first new school in Australia for 60 years). Later, as Inaugural Head of Department at La Trobe University in Victoria, Marc led the start-up of the second new dental program in recent Australian history. Marc was also principal dental consultant to Charles Sturt University where he supported the development of a new regional-based dental school New South Wales. Marc’s innovation activities in oral health education are sought-after across Australia; he is currently an Adjunct Professor at James Cook University (Queensland) where he was part of the small team that facilitated the development of their new dental school (the fourth in Australia). Marc is Adjunct Professor at Bond University. Marc was a founding developer service linked education for dental students in Australia and is sort-after across the country to assist in the ongoing development of these programs. He continues to teach in various dental programs across Australia and beyond and is Chief Examiner (primaries) for the RACDS. His dental teaching material on YouTube has had over 250,000 viewers from 130 countries and he has one of Australia’s largest twitter followings in dentistry where he talks about dental public health and marginalization.

Abstract:

Marc, will share his nearly two-decade experience in developing, implementing and sustaining novel solutions in public dental health reform in Australia. Lesions from experiences, good and bad, success and failure will be shared. He will provide insights into the successes (and risks) associated with these ground-breaking developments. His story of innovation is littered with road-blocks that were overcome and lessons for the next generation. As part of the program he will share his experience in vertically and horizontally integrate cutting-edge service models across nearly a dozen of the world’s most remote locations. He will also share stories of the good, bad and plain terrifying in the development of a fairer, just and open dental system in Australia. His efforts in workforce and dental education will be a focus as well as the application of evidence and technology for the solutions to address the next phase of reform. Marc, as always, will lift rocks that no one else wants light to shine under. For sure a thought provoking insight into innovation and reform in Australian Oral Health.

Keynote Forum

Leonie M. Short

Central Queensland University,
Australia

Keynote: Innovative Educational Approach for Oral Health Therapy Education in Australia

Time : 10:30-11:00

Conference Series Dental Congress 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Leonie M. Short  photo
Biography:

Leonie M Short is the Discipline Lead for the Bachelor of Oral Health degree at CQ University, She is a registered dental practitioner – dental therapist – in Australia. She has completed a Certificate in Dental Therapy from the Westmead School of Dental Therapy in 1977, a Diploma in Clinical Hypnotherapy from the NSW School of Hypnotic Sciences in 1983, a Bachelor of Arts degree with a double major in Education and Sociology from Wollongong University in 1986, and a Masters of Health Planning from the University of NSW in 1987. She has numerous publications and research grants in excess of $1m. She is the Editorial Board Member of the Australia and New Zealand Journal of Dental and Oral Health Therapy as well as Australian Options.

Abstract:

This paper outlines the development of the Bachelor of Oral Health degree at the CQ University in Rockhampton from 2010 to the present. This three-year degree trains and educates graduates to perform preventive and operative dentistry on patients of all ages. It is only one of three oral health degrees in Australia and New Zealand to be accredited for adult scope of practice. The program does not sit alongside dental programs; it sits alongside programs in medical science, sonography, medical imaging, chiropractic and paramedic science as well as nursing, speech therapy, podiatry, physiotherapy and occupational therapy. The curriculum aims to foster a collaborative approach to clinical practice with oral health students studying and learning with, and from, students from other disciplines. In this way, links between oral health and systemic health are made in terms of patient-centred care. Clinical placements in residential care facilities and in the CQ University Health Clinic will be used to illustrate this innovative education approach for oral health therapy students at CQ University.

Keynote Forum

Boyen Huang

Charles Sturt University,
Australia

Keynote: Genetic implications of supernumerary teeth for tooth regeneration

Time : 11:15-11:45

Conference Series Dental Congress 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Boyen Huang photo
Biography:

Boyen Huang is the Head of School at Charles Sturt University (CSU) School of Dentistry and Health Sciences. Before joining CSU, he held teaching and research posts at the University of Western Australia (Australia), Kyoto University (Japan) and James Cook University (Australia). He has current research collaboration with institutions in Australia, Japan, Taiwan and Thailand. He was successively involved in sectional, divisional and regional executive roles of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). In addition, he is a Co-Editor-in-Chief for Oral Health and Dental Management, and a journal editorial board member for two other dental journals. He is also a peer reviewer for more than a dozen scientific journals related to medicine, dentistry and public health, and an assessor/panel member of grant proposals to the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC, Australia). Of further note, he has worked in private practice as a general and paediatric dentist with a full dentist license in Australia and Taiwan.

Abstract:

Replacing missing teeth with approaches other than dental prosthetics has become a focus in dental research over the decade. The non-prosthetic approaches proposed included scaffold-based tooth regeneration, cell pellet engineering, gene-manipulated tooth regeneration and inductive formation of the third dentition. Although supernumerary teeth have been considered as a dental disease or a sign of genetic disorders, recent research in formation of supernumerary teeth implied a pathway to tooth regeneration. Using murine models, several genes relevant to the mechanisms were identified. The presenter will outline research findings of his team and other colleagues and suggest a potential direction of future molecularly targeted therapy to replace missing teeth.

  • Current Concepts in Dental and Oral Health
Location: Brisbane

Session Introduction

Anthony Ancell

Woollahra Dental Practice,
Australia

Title: Ortho-postural Dentistry: A broader view of oral health

Time : 12:45-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Anthony Ancell is the Principle Dentist at Woollahra Dental Practice. Since leaving Sydney University as a dentist in 1980 he has had an incredible journey in his profession. The realization of how important dentistry can be has had a huge impact on his enjoyment. Anthony is trained as a Dentist and a pioneer of ortho-postural dentistry. This is his prime area of interest. Anthony has practices located in Woollahra and Queanbeyan.

Abstract:

If you thought oral health was only about brushing and flossing this will open your eyes (and your mouth) to a much bigger picture. A must for anybody with a mouth and interested in their health, and yet may never have fully connected the two. Dr. Anthony Ancell joins us to discuss ortho-postural dentistry. Anthony is not only a dentist in a private practice in Sydney, but he is also a world-leader in the concept of ortho-postural dentistry; how the shape and health of your mouth impacts your ability to breathe well, sleep well, your posture and much, much more.

Speaker
Biography:

Lynette Wallace graduated from University of Sydney in 1994 with Honours. She has been in private practice in Bowral since 1994. She takes a multi-diciplinary approach to patient care, studying both in the USA and Australia in orthodontics and neuromuscular dentistry and kinesiology. She is currently enrolled in the MClin Dent program with BPP University City of London. Her key area of interest lies in looking at the whole body physiological coherence and its links with mouth breathing and dental caries, using biofeedback computer monitoring.

Abstract:

Talks about physiological coherence and how it can be measured with biofeedback computer program as an adjunct to treatment. Effect of mouthbreathing on the autonomic nervous system which takes its cue from breathing frequency and controls 90% of the body’s involuntary functions including immune system response, hormonal response, metabolism and digestion. How biofeedback monitoring is used in mouthbreathing program in conjunction with myofunctional trainers to display and monitor progress using Heart Rate Variability HRV, not only with conversion to nasal breathing but also a changes in emotional state, mental focus, motivation and energy. Relationship of physiological coherence to dental caries and how it activates and deactivates salivary proteins. Relationship of coherence to interproximal decay, How coherence reflects an ordered synchronization between the sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system in the flow of information throughout the body.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Janet Wallace is an Oral Health Therapist Lecturer at the University of Newcastle, Australia. Janet has extensive experience in clinical practice and a special interest in teaching experiential oral health student learning in aged care. In 2009, Janet implemented a residential aged care student placement program for final year dental hygiene students; this research has generated international publications, national and international conference presentations and significant grants to expand the research. Janet is a member of the Faculty of Health and Medicine, Faculty Board at the University of Newcastle, a life member of ADOHTA, a peer reviewer for the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Dental and Oral Health Therapy and an appointed member of the Dental Council of NSW.

Abstract:

Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether dental hygiene students from the University of Newcastle, Australia, attending residential aged care facilities (RACFs) during a placement program gained any knowledge about the oral care of elderly patients and the RACF environment. Method: Final year dental hygiene students undertook a 12-week placement, one day per week, in one of 17 residential aged care facilities on the NSW Central Coast. Students completed pre and post-placement questionnaires, which recorded their knowledge of medical, dental and environmental issues related to older people. The placement questionnaires usedfive point Likert scales, ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree, pre- and post-mean scores were produced for each question and P values calculated using a paired t-test. Results: Thirty three students attended the placement, 26 (79%) completed both the pre- and post-placement questionnaires. Post-placement mean scores as compared to pre-placement mean scores showed significant improvement in student knowledge of medical (P < 0.05) and dental (P < 0.05) conditions specific to the older person and improvement in knowledge (P < 0.05) about the residential aged care facility environment. Conclusion: The placement program enhanced student knowledge across three subject categories; medical and dental conditions of the older person and the structure and services of the residential aged care environment.

Sally Bing

Bing Dental, New Zealand

Title: Revolutionizing the world of Dental Hygienists

Time : 14:45-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Sally has been working in dentistry for 20 years and she is a NZDC qualified Dental Hygienist. In addition to Dental Hygienist, she has Dental Technology and Dental Therapy qualifications, also qualified in Self Expression and Leadership with certification from the Landmark Forum organization. Worked with the One 2 One Charitable Trust in Cambodia. Sally shared oral health information and inspiration in the Cannons Creek area near Porirua, an initiative sponsored by Colgate and Listerine.

Abstract:

Trained dental hygienists that are fresh from school are boxed in and therefore limited in what they can do for their clients. Their mantra: \"Gum/Periodontal disease is dental hygienists responsibility\".
This has to change it\'s time to give the clients tools to take charge. The dental hygienist assists this process by building a trustful relationship with their clients and empowering them by educating and giving them tools to change habits.
Result: happy clients that are motivated to take the responsibility to look after their oral health.

  • Basic Dentistry
Location: Brisbane
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Bakr received his Bachelor Degree in Dental Medicine and Surgery from Cairo University in 2004. He completed his Masters Degree in Oral Biology from Cairo University in 2010. He was appointed as an academic within different departments in the Faculty of Dentistry (Cairo University) with a special focus on Oral Histopathology and Restorative Dentistry in 2005, where he gained experience in Dental Education for five years. After moving to Australia in 2010, Dr. Bakr was appointed to teach within the School of Biomedical Sciences (University of Queensland). Dr. Bakr held different positions in Griffith University including sessional teaching of Oral Biology, Head and Neck Anatomy, sessional clinical supervision, Casual lecturing in Restorative Dentistry, besides being appointed as a Research Assistant in the Haptic Dental Simulation (Simodont®) research project. In 2012, was Dr. Bakr was appointed as a full-time Lecturer in General Dental Practice. In 2013, he completed a Graduate Certificate in Higher Education from Griffith University. Currently Dr. Bakr doing a PhD investigating the role of PTH in the healing of stress fractures in bone.

Abstract:

Haptic simulators have been successfully used in medical education but are relatively new tools in dental education. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of early exposure to haptic feedback (via the MOOG Simodont® Virtual Dental Trainer) on the development of psychomotor skills and on the subsequent performance of a previously unseen manual task. Forty (40) second year Dental Science students enrolled at Griffith University (Australia) were randomly divided into two groups. They were then given manual dexterity tasks in a haptic and a non-haptic environment but in a different sequence for each group (early- or late-haptic experience). Pre-experimental, post experimental and flow questionnaires were completed by participants. The Mental Rotation Test –A (MRT-A) was used to control for differences in visual-spatial abilities. Borg’s CR-10 scale was used to control for possible differences in mental effort between haptic and non-haptic training sessions. Overall, the students accepted the new dental simulator well. Participants commented both positively and negatively on the fidelity of the preclinical experience. The group that ended with haptic training performed slightly (though not significantly) better than the group that commenced training with haptics (Paired t-test; P= 0.06). Our study showed that haptic simulators could be combined with other methods in preclinical dental skills development but there is no clear evidence in this study that early exposure per se to haptic feedback and the MOOG Simodont® Virtual Dental Trainer could better assist in the development of psychomotor skills in Restorative Dentistry.

Rui Franco

Beurze Tandartsen,
Netherlands

Title: Cementation of aesthetic resin composite indirect restorations

Time : 15:35-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Rui Franco has completed his Masters Degree in Aesthetic Dentistry at the age of 23 from Instituto Superior de Ciências de Saúde Egas Moniz, Portugal in 2009. In 2010 he did a post-graduation in dental implants. Since 2010 he started co-owning the Vale de Milhaços Medical Center and also became the Clinical Director from this multi-discipline private practice. At the end of 2011 Rui Franco started living and working in the Netherlands, where he continues to improve his studies in order to excel in the dental care provided by him.

Abstract:

Presently resin composites enable the dentist to faithfully reproduce the anatomy and dental morphology in the same way that only ceramic could. However, when resin composites are applied in direct restorations they always trigger tensions from its polymerization contraction. This negative factor is inherent in the use of composite resins. In the presence of a large cavity, it may be indicated to apply a laboratory restoration, this is, an indirect restoration. The longevity of indirect restorations is largely determined by its bond strength, depending on the cementing technique used. The use of resin cements is increasing in these restorations, but there is still no consensus about the best technique to be applied. The case reviewed in this work is based on an entire review on the current techniques of resin cements in indirect aesthetic composite restorations. It is performed an analysis of the clinical and laboratory procedures of an indirect aesthetic resin composite restoration in a lower left first molar. Are detailed aspects the mechanical and physical properties of resin cements, as well as variants of the different types of polymerization and adhesion to the tooth structure. The objectives of this study are to contribute, through a detailed literature review, to the assessment of the state of the art of resin cements, giving special emphasis to the influence of its mechanical and physical properties as well as the cementing technique in the clinical success of an indirect aesthetic composite restoration.

Massimiliano Zuppardi

Zuppardi Dental Studio,
Australia.

Title: Protocol for prosthetic implant restorations

Time : 17:15-17:40

Speaker
Biography:

Massimiliano Zuppardi completed his dental technology degree in Naples and father, Giuseppe Zuppardi, mentored his development throughout the 1980\'s. Max has been rewarded with acceptance in to the International Oral Design Group, which recognizes dental ceramists whose artistic talent, character and performance of craftsmanship are of the highest degree. Max further developed his skill by learning from master technicians such as Willi Geller, M.H.Poltz, P.Adar, D.Shultz and R.Pascetta. Max\'s speciality lies in aesthetics and morphology and he is continually keeping up to date with the most innovative technology in dental restoration. He is also a dental educator who has lectured extensively around the world. He gives hands-on courses for technicians on aesthetics, precision and morphology. Max and his family moved from Naples, Italy to Manly, Sydney at the end of 2011.

Abstract:

The aim of this practical lecture is to outline the ideal steps in prosthetic implant restorations, from a single tooth to a full mouth rehabilitation. The lecture will cover all stages: an accurate patient analysis, the treatment plan, selecting all the parameters for an ideal restoration, the mock up, the temporary and the selection of the materials for the final restoration. Crucial for implant cases, the lecture will also discuss the emergence profile management for ideal soft tissue support areas for cleansing. This is achieved by the compensation of the flange, supported by a ceramic ZI or TI framework, without having to resort to invasive surgery with bone augmentation and soft tissue grafts. The stages will be explained through the presentation of a case study. The lecture will cover the protocol to obtain a precise passive Procera Implant Bridge in a predictable manner, through systematic technology (CAD/CAM). The discussion will cover all the concepts, issues and compromises, such as the reduction of fracture and chipping risks in the morphological reconstruction. By combining shape, functionality and color the aesthetic result will be an optimal integration in situ.

Harnie Jo

University of Otago, New Zealand

Title: Survival times and reasons for failure of orthodontic retainers (pilot study)

Time : 17:40-18:00

Speaker
Biography:

Harnie graduated from the University of Otago, New Zealand with a Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree. She is currently working full-time as a general dental practitioner in a private dental practice at Gisborne, on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand. Her dental interests include Oral surgery and Endodontics. Harnie’s pilot study on Survival Times and Reasons for Failure of Orthodontic Retainers was awarded the Ivoclar Vivadent Student Research Elective Award in Dentistry for 2014. In her spare time, she enjoys musical appreciation, the outdoors, yoga and swimming.

Abstract:

Abstract Retainers are an essential component of successful orthodontic treatment, required to be worn for sufficient periods of time following fixed appliance therapy to prevent relapse. Retainer failure may compromise treatment outcomes. Objective: The aims of this retrospective study were to assess the survival times and the reasons for failure of orthodontic retainers used at the School of Dentistry, Otago University. Methods: 117 retainers were included in this study. Eligibility for inclusion required retention periods be of at least 24 months. Data regarding types of retainers, survival time, and reasons for failure were collected. Results: Hawley, vacuum-formed and fixed retainers were used at the School of Dentistry for retention. Overall, 58.8% of maxillary retainers and 59.2% of the mandibular retainers survived for 24 months or more. At 24-months retention, the survival rates were 52.9% for upper fixed retainers, 57.1% for upper vacuum-formed retainers, 57.9% for lower fixed retainers, 63.3% for upper Hawley retainers, and 72.7% for lower vacuum-formed retainers. The majority of failures occurred within the first six months of retention, particularly for upper and lower fixed retainers (35.3% and 31.6%). The most common reasons for failure were breakage (63.6% for Hawley; 66.7% for upper vacuum-formed retainers) and debonding (82.4% for lower fixed retainers). Conclusion: Over the 24-month retention period, upper fixed and upper vacuum-formed retainers had the lowest survival rates, while lower vacuum-formed and upper Hawley retainers had the highest survival rates. Breakage and debonding were the two main reasons for failure.