Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Asia Pacific Congress & Expo on Dental and Oral Health Brisbane, Australia .

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Dr. Roy George

Griffith University,
Australia.

Keynote: Role of laser activated in detection and disinfection of the root canal spaces.

Time : 10:00-10:30

Conference Series Dental Congress 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dr. Roy George  photo
Biography:

Roy George is a Senior lecturer and the Unit Lead for Endodontics at the School of Dentistry and Oral Health at Griffith University since 2008. He completed his Masters in Conservative dentistry and Endodontics, PhD in Laser applications and Graduate Certificate in Higher Education. George holds an adjunct position at the University Of Queensland, where he is a member of the lasers in dentistry research group. George has a particular interest in laser applications, and in dental material science and has experience with a number of hard and soft tissue lasers. He also has a keen interest in dental education research and uptake of technology. George has over 15 years of teaching experience and has published over 45 peer review articles. George is currently the Editor in Chief of the International Journal of Dental Clinics, A/Editor of Laser in Medical Science, a peer reviewer for a number of International Journals and a Member of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons.

Abstract:

Bacterial elimination within root dentine is important for the success of endodontically treated teeth. Pulsed Laser-enhancement of EDTAC has previously been shown to increase removal of smear layer and enhance debridement of the root canal spaces. Shockwave’s generated by lasers in fluid-filled root canal spaces generate shock waves that create shear stresses along the root canals walls, enhancing removal of the smear layer and biofilm. In addition, lasers may also provide a benefit through photothermal disinfection. However, effective and efficient laser activation of irrigants or medicament is root canals spaces depends on factors such laser wavelength, volume of fluid being lased, absorption characteristics of irrigants, laser energy settings, fiberoptic tip design etc. Our studies have shown that, careful selection of the correct laser wavelength, laser parameters and irrigants could provide a safe, efficient and rapid alternative to current endodontic disinfection protocols.

Keynote Forum

Kazuhiko Nakano

Osaka University, Japan.

Keynote: Streptococcus mutans and systemic diseases - current knowledge and future perspective

Time : 10:30-11:00

Conference Series Dental Congress 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kazuhiko Nakano photo
Biography:

Dr. Kazuhiko Nakano completed his D.D.S. degree at Osaka University and received a Ph.D. from Osaka University. Later, he was appointed as Chief of the Outpatient Clinic of the Pediatric Dentistry Clinic, Osaka University Dental Hospital. More recently, Dr. Nakano became Professor of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry as well as Head of the Pediatric Dentistry Clinic of Osaka University Dental Hospital. Dr. Nakano is a trustee of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Dentistry, and a member of the International Association of Dental Research. He has authored and co-authored many original research articles and clinical reports, as well as several book chapters in the field of pediatric dentistry and clinical oral microbiology.

Abstract:

Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, is occasionally isolated from blood of patients with bacteremia and infective endocarditis (IE). It has been demonstrated that an approximately 120 kDa collagen-binding protein (Cnm protein) located on the bacterial cell surface is an important factor for onset of IE, as animal experiments using genetically engineered S. mutans strains have clearly demonstrated that Cnm is a major factor for its development. In addition, Cnm-positive S. mutans strains have been more frequently identified in saliva obtained from patients with cerebral hemorrhage, a major complication of IE, as compared to that from healthy subjects. An animal model of cerebral hemorrhage revealed aggravation of cerebral hemorrhage following infection with Cnm-positive S. mutans via the jugular vein. Interestingly, Cnm-positive S. mutans strains have also been more frequently identified in patients with cerebral micro-bleeding. Analyses of various in vitro experiments showed that Cnm of S. mutans possibly inhibits hemostasis of impaired blood vessel endothelium. Furthermore, Cnm-positive S. mutans strains have been shown to aggravate inflammatory bowel diseases and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis by elevating the level of disease-related cytokines secreted in liver tissue. Although large-scale human studies are needed to conclude the relationship of Cnm-positive S. mutans with systemic diseases, it is possible to speculate that oral health approaches to control this specific type of S. mutans may lead to improve a systemically healthy condition.

Keynote Forum

Sigal Jacobson

The Inventor of Uveneer System,
Australia.

Keynote: An introduction to the biomimetic aesthetic dentistry and the smile design rules

Time : 11:15-11:55

Conference Series Dental Congress 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sigal Jacobson  photo
Biography:

Dr Sigal Jacobson has over 20 years of clinical experience and enjoys the pursuit of teaching and advancing the skills in biomimetic and conservative aesthetic dentistry. Dr Jacobson is the inventor of the patented UVENEER™, a unique template System for creating direct composite veneers and mock -ups. \\\\r\\\\nThe system is a unique way to create predictable polished restorations and has stirred great interest from thousands of dental offices worldwide along with an array of key opinion leaders. Dr Jacobson has contributed clinical case studies and lectures internationally on Biomimetic techniques and using the Uveneer System. In her lectures she provides insightful tips and practical learning for general dentists. She is a fellow of the American Academy of dental facial esthetics, Australian Academy of Dental Facial Aesthetics, and the American Academy of Cosmetic dentistry.\\\\r\\\\n

Abstract:

The Uveneer system, step by step on how to create direct veneers with the Uveneer templates with predictable results in fraction of the time and other application of the system mock ups, temporarization, class 4 and 5, with cases and live videos.\\\\r\\\\nUveneer™ creates composite veneers that are contoured and shiny like natural teeth, while saving time and effort—no more carving and polishing! Work smarter and faster with predictable results. Unlike prefabricated veneer systems, with Uveneer™ dentists use their own composite and can also use layering techniques. The Uveneer™ process removes several shortcomings of prefabricated systems including thickness, sizing and shade restrictions,\\\\r\\\\ncost, and stock holding. It’s so easy, dentists can incorporate more direct composite veneer work into their schedule, creating a real opportunity to increase practice income.

  • Oral Pathology and Clinical Physiology
Location: Brisbane

Session Introduction

Garth D Pettit

4 Your Smile 2 Shine Pty Ltd.,
Australia

Title: Paint your mouth

Time : 11:55-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Garth D Pettit graduated Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) in November 1953 from University of Adelaide, School of Dentistry. He retired from dental practice in December 1991. His expertise, gathered over a period ongoing since 1995, is teaching people of all ages how to prevent common oral diseases such as tooth decay, gum diseases, bad breath and stained teeth. However his research he did in 2001, led him to believe that the 500 year old instruction Brush Your Teeth was misleading, often did not prevent these diseases and in fact could be a cause of these diseases. In February 2011 he published, in Amazon Kindle, twelve eBooks. Two were new and ten were from electronic copies of his original 10 Mouth Wise Oral HealthCare Manuals. They were titled “Oral 7 Hygiene – Paint Your Mouth. Visit 1 of 12 Visits to GarGarThe Dentist” etc. Later they were re-titled “Paint Your Mouth”, then “How Do I Look After My Kids Teeth?” Now they are to published under the title “Teaching Oral Disease Prevention”.

Abstract:

“Paint Your Mouth” is an instruction. It is unique, totally oral, oral hygiene instruction that is infinitely more efficient in preventing oral diseases than the 15th Century instruction “Brush Your Teeth”. “Brush Your Teeth” was invented by a Chinese Emperor in 1498, the year he patented the first tooth brush made with bristles. Bristles were taken from the back of a Siberian hog’s neck. The tooth brush handle was made from either bamboo or bone. The bristles were inserted into and at right angles to the handle. A tooth brush in this, the 21st century is made with plastic handles and nylon bristles. Even the name tooth brush is archaic. It refers to only surface in the mouth to brush: teeth. I call a tooth brush, Mouth Brush, and tooth paste Mouth Paste. In 1996, 5 years after retiring from dental practice my granddaughter was diagnosed the early tooth decay in a front, upper deciduous tooth. Angrily I made this mission: “Prevent Oral Disease in Children”.But, in these books childrenlearn much more than the oral hygiene instruction. They are taught that when they eat or drink their whole mouth is covered with harmful plaque, not just teeth but also gums, tongue, roof, floor, cheeks and lips inside the mouth. Combining “Paint Your Mouth” and knowledge they acquire from the books will help them to enjoy their lives free from common oral diseases and many general disease such as heart attacks, high blood pressure, Alzheimers disease, strokes, diabetes and more.

Speaker
Biography:

John Loudon obtained his undergraduate training in dentistry and went on to complete a PhD at Sydney University in biochemistry. He then completed post-doctoral studies in Japan, Tsukuba science city, USA, Roswell Park Cancer Inst. in renin-angiotensin molecular biology. He has obtained specialist Certification and a Fellowship within the field of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology at The Ohio State University. He has written over ten significant single author articles in addition to contributing towards numerous co-authored works and is an invited reviewer. He maintains a focused interest in cardiac and vascular disease, cancer and infectious diseases in addition to dental sciences research.

Abstract:

The concept of focal infection has been revisited with mounting evidence that chronic dental infections such as periodontal disease align with vasculopathy (atheroma) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Paradoxically, heart disease as measured by an irreversible ischaemic cardiac \'event\' is not strongly clinically related to focal chronic dental infections. Further, this paradox is also extended to neurology whereby dementia, although relating to vasculopathy, is not strongly positively clinically correlated with inflammatory dental disease. A plausible rationale to explain these paradoxes is presented whereby proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide are pictured as mediators of cellular homeostasis, maintaining a prosurvival, and cytoprotective environment. Dysregulation of the immune system forms an important driver in determining imbalance in homeostasis during chronic inflammation leading to vasculopathy and cardiac pathology such as hypertrophy. Excessive prosurvival stimulus often times via cancer-related cascades reflects the dysregulated homeostasis observed in the pathology of chronic inflammation. By moderating dysregulated homeostasis agents such as rebamipide, resveratrol and amlexanox may target such pathologies. Notably, amlexanox, an immunomodulatory drug used to manage aphthous ulcers may be repurposed in this respect as its mechanism of action includes targeting key kinase enzymes involved in innate immunity that align with dysregulated inflammation. A strategy is therefore proposed for restoring imbalance in homeostasis seen in chronic dental inflammatory conditions to help prevent systemic comorbidities.

Nihal Bandara

University of Queensland, Australia

Title: Fungi in the Oral cavity: The opportunistic foes

Time : 12:45-13:10

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Nihal Bandara has received his Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) with honours from The University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, and graduated with honours as the Most Outstanding Dental Student of Sri Lanka (2001-2006). Subsequently, He received my Ph.D. in Oral microbiology (specializing, in mycology, bacteriology and molecular biology) from The Faculty of Dentistry, the University of Hong Kong under three distinguished scientists, Professor Lakshman Samaranayake, Professor L. J Jin and Dr. Rory Watt. His thesis was based on the communal interactions of Candida and bacteria in mixed species biofilms that could cause a variety of oral and non-oral infections. After completion of his Ph.D, he joined the laboratory of Dr. Hugh Smyth at the College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin, Texas, USA to pursue work on novel approaches for drug delivery into microbial biofilms. Currently, he is a Senior Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the School of Dentistry, University of Queensland, Australia and investigate on eradication of oral candidal infections using novel drug delivery technologies. Dr. Bandara has published over 15 research articles, 2 book chapters, 2 provisional patents and many abstracts and attended a number of international conferences. He has won many national and international awards for his excellence in dentistry and research. Specially, the International Association for Dental Research awarded him the IADR Research in Prevention Travel Award at its 89th General Sessions held in California. Also, in 2011, the University of Hong Kong awarded him the Research Output Award for the most outstanding scientific output from its Faculty of Dentistry.

Abstract:

Candida is a dimorphic fungus commonly isolated in skin, mucosa, gut and genitourinary tract. Over 50% oral cavities are colonized by Candida as a commensal organism. Due to its versatility and the ability to live in many body sites, Candida is considered an important opportunistic pathogen. According to US National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System, Candida is the 4th most common cause of bloodstream infection. Candida biofilms can readily develop in immunocompromised hosts including individuals under immunosuppressives or broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, neonates, patients with diabetes and HIV and patients having indwelling devices. Thus, Candida becomes opportunistically pathogenic and causes superficial infections in the mucosa to deep, invasive and life-threatening systemic candidiasis. In addition the incidence of noncandidal oral infections such as aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, and zygomycosis (mucormycosis) is gradually increasing. Thus, the knowledge of oral fungal infections will be highly beneficial for oral health care professionals in the prevention and management of such infections in routine dental patients.

Farrukh Faraz

Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, India

Title: Adjunctive photodynamic therapy for treatment of localized chronic periodontitis

Time : 13:55-14:20

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Faraz is currently working as Associate Professor at Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences. He did his graduation in Dental Surgery in year 1997 and subsequently obtained MDS in Periodontis in July 2002. He has been a merit scholarship holder and has been awarded a number of merit certificates during the graduation as well as post graduation.

Abstract:

Background: Adjunctive treatment modalities are often required to supplement mechanical periodontal therapy as it often fails to debride completely the deeper pockets and furcations. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT), “the light induced inactivation of cells, microorganisms or molecules” has been used as antimicrobial periodontal treatment on the concept of generating singlet oxygen and free radicals that are cytotoxic to microorganisms, by activating a photosensitizer agent using diode laser. This paper describes a clinical study to evaluate the benefits of using PDT along with scaling and root planing (SRP) compared to SRP alone. Aim: To find out the clinical outcome of photodynamic therapy when used along with conventional non-surgical treatment of localized deep periodontal pockets. Materials & Methods: Thirty patients with periodontal pockets of ≥6 mm in at least two non-adjacent teeth were included in study. One of the teeth received PDT after full mouth SRP, while another served as control. Plaque Index, Modified Sulcular Bleeding Index, Probing Pocket depth and Clinical Attachment Level were recorded at baseline, after 1 month and 3 months postoperatively. Results: Significant improvement was observed in both groups in terms of all recorded parameters 3 months postoperatively. At 1 month interval, inter-group difference was significant in terms of modified Sulcular bleeding index, and Probing Depth which decreased more at sites treated with PDT compared to the test sites. Conclusion: Antimicrobial PDT used along with SRP results in significant higher reduction in bleeding scores, and pocket depth reduction compared with SRP alone.

Speaker
Biography:

Neha Saksena has completed her BDS and shall complete her MDS (Periodontology) in the summer of 2015 from Pt. BD Sharma University, Rohtak, India. She is an academically active student and has attended various conferences and continuing dental education programmes. She has 5 published papers to her credit including 1 in an international journal. She also has delivered 9 oral and poster presentations in various national specialty and general dentistry conferences. She has been a recipient of 3rd best paper presentation award at the 12th Indian Society of Periodontology Post Graduate Convention, 2013.

Abstract:

An immense variation in and significance of Gingival Biotype (GB) or Gingival Thickness (GT) has been widely recognized in the literature. To begin with, gingival morphology was explained by Ochsenbein and Ross as scalloped (thin) gingiva and flat (thick) gingiva. Later on, Claffey and Shanley defined a thin tissue biotype having GT of ≤ 1.5mm and a thick tissue biotype having ≥ 2mm. India, being a predominant part of the southern region of Asian subcontinent is popularly known as the “Land of Diversity”. Among the racial diversity in India, two major racial types identified are the Ancestral North Indians (ANI) corresponding to the Indo-Aryan population of northern India and Ancestral South Indians (ASI) corresponding to the Dravidian population of southern India. Until now, gingival biotype has been assessed in populations belonging to the Caucasian race. A cross-sectional study with a total of 100 periodontally healthy subjects belonging to the two major racio-ethnic groups of India, whose gingival biotype measured by a non-invasive ultrasonographic device were evaluated. The inclusion of individuals was on the basis of individual’s name, place of birth, mother tongue and self identification. The study revealed a thicker biotype in ASI group but it was found to be statistically insignificant. Within the racio-ethic group, a thicker biotype was found in males, older age group and mandibular arch. Gingival Biotype has proven its relevance as a diagnostic and a prognostic factor prior to any esthetic procedure and thus further research is necessary.

Abhishek Parolia

International Medical University, Malaysia

Title: Debridement in Endodontics

Time : 14:45-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Abhishek Parolia has served as an assistant professor and reader in Manipal University and currently working as a senior lecturer in International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur. He graduated from Manipal University and perused his masters in the field of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics at the same university. He was awarded a gold medal in Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. He is actively involved in research and received Research Incentive Award in 2010 and 2011 from Manipal University and Marquis Award (USA) in 2011. He received an award for his significant contribution as a newcomer in the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Malaysia. He was also awarded for his Invaluable contribution in leading ICDAS initiative from the school of Dentistry, International Medical University in 2014. He is a member of ICDAS National Benchmark Group, Malaysia. He has published many scientific papers in national and international peer-reviewed journals and authored chapters “Diagnosis in Endodontics” in the book entitled Essentials of Endodontics, published in 2012 by Quintessence India and “Propolis and its implications in oral health” in the book entitled Beneficial Effects of Propolis on Human Health and Chronic Diseases. Volume 2, Published in 2012 by Nova Publications USA. He is a reviewer of Indian Journal of Dental Research, Journal of Dental Education, European Journal of Dentistry, Malaysian Dental Journal, International Journal of Dental Hygiene and member of editorial board of Journal of Conservative Dentistry. He is a member of FODI, Malaysian Dental Association, International Association of Dental Research and International Cariology group. He has conducted workshops and lectured locally and internationally at many countries namely India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Dubai, Brazil and Canada.

Abstract:

The main goal of endodontic therapy is thorough chemomechanical debridement of the entire root canal system followed by a three-dimensional obturation with an inert filling material and a final coronal restoration. Debridement of the root canal plays a very critical role to achieve a successful endodontic outcome. Endodontic disease is a biofilm-mediated infection, and primary aim in the management of endodontic disease is the elimination of bacterial biofilm from the root canal system. It is important to apply the biofilm concept to endodontic microbiology to understand the pathogenic potential of the root canal microbiota as well as to form the basis for new approaches for disinfection. From these aspects, the formation of biofilms carries particular clinical significance because not only host defence mechanisms but also therapeutic efforts including chemical and mechanical antimicrobial treatment measures have the most difficult task of dealing with organisms that are gathered in a biofilm. This presentation will highlight the role of biofilm, challenges, latest techniques and concepts in the debridement of root canal.

  • Pediatric Dentistry
Location: Brisbane
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Pirkko-Liisa Tarvonen graduated and specialized in public health care at University of Turku, Finland. With thirty years of experience in dental public health, she works as Senior Dental Officer at University Dental Clinic in Helsinki, Finland. She has also gained experience as project coordinator to develop patient classification model and to organize out-of-hours emergency oral health care as well as national information systems for oral health care. Since 2007, she has worked voluntarily as project coordinator in a development collaboration project to support primary oral health care and dental education in Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Abstract:

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral self-care practices among primary school children in Pyongyang, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), after six years operations of Children’s Oral Health Promotion Programme (COHPP). Methods: The COHPP as part of the development collaboration has educated kindergarten and primary school teachers in oral self-care; the teachers in turn have educated children and their parents along with the school work. The COHPP has also provided toothbrushes and fluoride toothpaste for children, and education materials for kindergartens and primary schools. After six years operations of the programme, in September 2013 a convenience sample 200 children (10 years of age) and their 200 guardians were selected for the study. Both groups were separately asked by structured, self-completed questionnaires about the child’s brushing frequency, use of fluoride toothpaste, use of sweet snacks (juice, ice cream, candy and biscuit) as well as the child’s main thirst quencher. Children’s own report was compared to the guardian’s report. Results: Brushing twice a day was common; 89% of the children and 78% of the guardians reported the child brushing his / her teeth at least twice a day. Of the reports 71% were unanimous; no association observed (p=0.239). All children and 92% of parents reported the child using fluoride toothpaste. Furthermore, snacking was popular: 90% of the children and 88% of parents reported the child eating sweet snacks at least twice a day, the unanimity being significant (p=0.047). 72% of children and 80% of parents reported the child using water as the main thirst quencher; others drank juice, cider, tea or milk. No association between the reports was observed (p=0.446). Conclusions: The COHPP has probably promoted beneficial self-care practices in its action sphere. However, sweet snacks were popular among primary school children. Implementation of the program to the whole country is important as is continuous evaluation.

Joanna Granich

The University of Western Australia,
Australia.

Title: Oral health, dental needs and barriers in children with an autism spectrum disorder

Time : 15:35-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Joanna Granich is the Clinical Trials Coordinator at the Telethon Kids Institute in Perth, Western Australia. Her role involves managing randomized controlled trials focused on investigating the effectiveness of medications and educational interventions for children with autism. Jo holds a Masters of Public Health by research from the University of Western Australia. She is also a registered sessional dental therapist in a private dental practice. She has a special interest in oral health of children with autism. Her other research interests include early intervention; complementary and alternative as well as prescribed medication use as treatments for children with autism.

Abstract:

Children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are a high-risk group for oral health problems due to difficulties in communication and understanding of the medical and functional need for oral health. There are no specific reports in Australia about dental health of children with ASD. We aimed to identify oral health, dental needs, oral hygiene, dental experience and related barriers to dental services of children with ASD as perceived by parents. An online survey completed by parents (n=73) of children with ASD (aged 2-17 years) was used to obtain data. Forty percent of children had oral health problems, commonly cited were stained teeth, bad breath and dental decay. The majority (53%) of children required physical, verbal or visual supports to brush their teeth with half of parents (51%) experiencing difficulties with the child’s daily oral care. One third (32%) of children felt afraid or anxious to visit the dentist, commonly cited reasons were oral instrumentation, bright lights and smells. Major barrier to seeking services was the operator’s lack of skills to adequately manage and treat children with ASD. Specific dental education for parents of children with ASD is imperative as part of a public dental health plan. Equally, a health promotion campaign may enhance awareness in this population about dental disease, oral hygiene and preventive measures for optimal dental health. Strategies to reduce anxiety of children with ASD when seeking dental treatment are also needed. This includes education of dental professionals about ASD and behaviour management strategies.

Arish Naresh

Tairawhiti District Health Board, New Zealand

Title: Child oral health status in rural communities in New Zealand

Time : 16:15-16:40

Speaker
Biography:

Arish Naresh is the Director of Allied Health and Technical, Tairawhiti DHB, New Zealand. Graduated from Fiji with honours in Dental Therapy in 2006 and moved to New Zealand to work as a registered dental therapist. Having had a strong public health interest, he then completed his post graduate studies in Leadership and Management and currently manages the dental services for Tairawhiti District Health located on the East Coast of NZ. Currently he is completing his Masters in Health Science. He is also the Director of Allied Health Services for the hospital and is a board member of NZ Dental and Oral Health Therapist Association. Arish is passionate about equity, equality and reducing inequalities especially for children and apart from his professional role he is also a board trustee of UNICEF New Zealand. He has been recognised for his contribution to migrant youth services by being recognised in the achievement category of Kiwibank Young New Zealander of the Year 2015. Arish enjoys football, rugby and music in his spare time.

Abstract:

Dental caries is a significant problem in New Zealand, with approximately fifty percent of children having experienced dental decay by age five. Dental care under general anaesthesia comprises as leading cause of admission to hospital for young children in a number of District Health Boards (DHBs) in New Zealand. The rate of decay is higher in Maori (indigenous) children compared to other ethnic groups. New Zealand was the first country in the world to introduce the profession of dental nursing (now known as dental therapists) in 1913 to combat the high rate of dental decay in children. The clinics were attached to schools but in more recent times, the School Dental Service focus has evolved to a Community Oral Health Service focus following the implementation of the “Good Oral Health for All, For Life” strategy. Dental care is free from birth until an individual’s eighteenth birthday and this presentation will highlight the successes, challenges and the future of child oral health in New Zealand with an added focus on child oral health status in the more geographical regions such as Tairawhiti. Access, equity and socioeconomic factors influencing the child’s health and oral health would also form part of the discussion. With more and more focus on early intervention and integrated care, some local and national strategies will be discussed that aid in the betterment of child health and oral health.

Biography:

Dr Asmaa Alkhtib holds a Clinical Doctoral degree in Paediatric Dentistry and a PhD in Population Health both from Melbourne University, Australia. Currently Dr Asmaa is the manager of Oral Health in Primary Health Corporation in Qatar. One of the her major roles is to implement the Beautiful Smiles Program, a comprehensive oral health program covering prevention, intervention and health promotion for children aged 0-5 years and pregnant women. This program is the first of it is kind in Qatar. Her research interests include public oral health especially on children, translational research, and capacity building of dental workforce.

Abstract:

Dental caries is a significant problem in Qatar. In a recent study we found that 89% of 4-5 years old Qatari children in governmental kindergartens had dental caries most of them had severe form of the disease. This high level of disease prevalence burden necessitates substantial preventive and measures from health authorities especially the Primary Health Care Corporation. The Beautiful Smile Program is a new comprehensive oral health program covering prevention, intervention and health promotion for children aged 1- 5 years old. This program envisions that all children in Qatar are enabled to have good oral health and have access to high quality oral health care. This program aims to create interdisciplinary collaboration between different health professionals in order to improve oral health of children especially during early childhood. The Program seeks to provide appropriate and timely dental treatment to children, in addition to preventing dental problems through education, early detection and appropriate actions by health practitioners at different levels. The program also targets pregnant women in antenatal services through provision of oral health promotion education as part of their routine health care. Services of this program will be provided through well-trained dentists and dental hygienist in collaboration with other health professionals who work in various sections in primary health care centres in Qatar.

  • Tools and Techniques in Dentistry
Location: Brisbane

Session Introduction

Hatem A. Alhadainy

Tanta University, Egypt.

Title: Artificial floor technique: The biological concept for the treatment of furcation perforation

Time : 17:05-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Hatem A. Alhadainy, BDS (Egy), MSD (Restorative, Egy), PhD (Endo, Egy-USA), MS (Epidemiology, USA) is a professor and Chairman of Endodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Tanta University. His work was concentrated on Endodontic research with extension in periodontology and Epidemiology. Dr. Alhadainy finished his Bachelor (1982) and Master degrees (1989) from Tanta University, Egypt and PhD degree as a channel program between Tanta University and University of Memphis, USA (1995). He also earned a MS Degree from Colorado State University, USA (2006). He is currently the Chairman of Endodontics Department in Tanta University from Aug. 2013. He was course director of postgraduate courses for several years. Dr. Alhadainy published more than 40 researches in National and International journals and reviewed several articles for international journals. He also presented researches in several international conferences including: Memphis, Chicago, Dallas (USA), Damarcus (Syria), Budapest (Hungary), Florence (Italy) Sanaa (Yemen) and Egypt.

Abstract:

Optimally, natural tooth structures should be used to repair a dental defect. If this is not possible, the objective should shifted to creating the optimal circumstances for healing the defect with normal tissues or repairing it with a material that has the closest properties to the lost tissues. The objectives of repairing furcation perforations are to seal the dentin defect and provide suitable conditions for formation of a new periodontal attachment. Some materials may provide adequate seal but may interfere with the formation of periodontal reattachment while others may initiate formation of new bone and periodontal attachment but cannot adequately seal the dentin defect. This may result in leakage of bacteria and their by-products into the lesion with eventual failure. Since the furcation perforation involves different types of inter-related tissues, each tissue within the defect should be considered separately. Artificial floor technique applies the biological concept for the repair of furcation perforations considering the periodontal wound and the dentinal wound of the defect separately. This new concept allows for a better understanding for the management of furcation perforation.

Shekhar Bhatia

The International Medical University, Malaysia.

Title: Performance of dental faculty members and undergraduates in caries detection after ICDAS training

Time : 17:30-17:55

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Shekhar Bhatia specializes in Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics and is presently working as Lecturer in International Medical University in Division of Clinical Dentistry. He pursued his B.D.S from Manipal University and M.D.S from J.S.S Dental College, Mysore with past experience as Senior lecturer in TMDCRC, India and lecturer in MAHSA University. He was appointed for the rank of Captain in Indian Army. He is a member of International association of Dental Research, Federation of Operative Dentistry of India, and Malaysian dental association. He has multiple publications in peer reviewed journals and has considerable experience in branch of Endodontics with more than thousands of Endodontic treatments done . He has special interest in Rotary Endodontics, single visit Endodontics, disinfection in Endodontics.

Abstract:

Introduction: ICDAS (the International Caries Detection and Assessment System) is a new approach for coding and recording the six stages of caries severity, varying from initial changes visible in enamel to frank cavitation in dentine. Objectives: To assess and compare the inter-examiner accuracy of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) among dental faculty members and undergraduates after ICDAS training for dental caries detection. Materials and Methods: Twenty permanent human teeth, without sealants or restorations and with a range of ICDAS codes between 0 and 6, were selected from a pool of extracted teeth and cleaned. Digital images of selected surfaces were taken using the Shofu Camera. Three dental faculty members examined the teeth and the details of each code were discussed based on a published paper concerning ICDAS until a consensus was reached and thereafter the reference set was developed and validated by the international expert of ICDAS before initiating the training session. ICDAS training using E-learning program, extracted teeth exercise and photograph discussion was given to dental faculty members of different specializations and dental undergraduates. After the training the participants were requested to code the carious lesion using ICDAS on the selected extracted teeth. Thereafter, these codes were compared with the reference set coding, Kappa (weighted: Wkappa) statistics and Yates corrected Chi Square were used using SPSS 17.0. Results: For detection of caries the calibration indicated an inter-rater Wkappa ranging from 0.67-0.85 among dental faculty members and 0.57-0.75 among dental undergraduates. There was no significant difference in between the performances of dental faculty members and dental undergraduates using ICDAS for dental caries detection (p>0.05). Conclusion: The ICDAS can be learned and practiced by dentist of any specialization and dental undergraduates. However, it could be suggested that more time prac¬ticing and training could help the study participants in developing their skills in the caries detection process.